The Four Longest Running Triathlons – Triathlon

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Not sure which game to sign up for this season or next? You might want to start with the tried-and-true triathlon that has been around since Ronald Regan was president. In a more challenging time (hello, COVID) challenging race production industry, these events have stood the test of time and continue to attract athletes year after year. Here are four of the longest-running triathlons.

related: Editor’s Pick: America’s Best Triathlon

escape from Alcatraz

established: 1981

2022 race dates: June 5

How it started: San Francisco Bay Area resident “Demon Joe” Oakes, circa 1980 came up with the idea of ​​this triathlon After competing in the Hawaii Triathlon, the event was then held in Honolulu. his thoughts? A race “more intense” than Iron Man, starting with a very cold swim at Alcatraz, cycling across the Golden Gate Bridge and then running along the hot and mountainous Dipsea Trail. And, in June 1981, the first Escape from Alcatraz triathlon was assembled to do just that. None of the competitors reportedly wore wetsuits, and the earliest runners took off from a rocky, windswept bay on Alcatraz for the water park (causing many racers to get off their bikes due to the shock of the cold water swimming) fell) . Over the years, the race has changed in many ways (including a $750 entry fee) and no longer crosses the Golden Gate Bridge, but Oakes’ original vision continues to this day.

More info: escapefromalcatraztri.com

Tupper Lake Tinman

established: 1982

2022 race dates: June 25

How it started: Inspired by the Hawaiian Triathlon event that started three years ago, this race in the Adirondack area of ​​New York is a favorite at Triathlon Lake Placid (the starting point of the IMLP, about 30 miles from Mirror Lake) Contest. Race organizers refer to their Half-Ironman long distance as “Ironman” as the race in Hawaii, and over the years it has grown from a hyperlocal event with 68 entrants to one that welcomes hundreds of athletes. “Bikes are heavier, wetsuits are rare, bike racks are wooden, buoys are made of milk cans, and two people are on either side of the finish line,” an article that reflects in the first few days of the game.Today, Tinman is still the big game, but the event Olympics, sprints, water cycling and team relays are also offered.

More information: tupperlaketinman.com

Los Angeles Triathlon Series

established: 1983

2022 race dates: October 2

Sometime in the early 1980s, Los Angeles businessman and World War II veteran Bill Fulton had the idea to start a triathlon series in his hometown. By 1983, he had launched the first series in the sport’s history, staged at Bonelli Park. San Gabriel Mountains. It wasn’t long before his race became the go-to for some of the best triathletes on the planet, Like Olympic silver medalist and triathlete champion Michelle Jones. (Fun fact: The triathlon wetsuit debuted at a race in Fulton in 1987.) Fulton died in 2016 at the age of 93, the son of his daughter Carolyn Walker. Wolk) eventually took over the series. until this year, when it changes management.

More information: trievents.com

Mission Bay Triathlon

established: 1988

2022 race dates: October 9

How it started: The game may be in its 34th year, but its roots go back farther – all the way to 1974 First U.S. Ironman Triathlon. Mission Bay in San Diego is considered the “birthplace” of triathlon and is where the sport started. Since then, the format of the competition has changed to a traditional triathlon (the 1974 competition featured run-bike-swim-run), but the essence and passion of multisport has remained the same. last year, 1900 players from all over the country participated in the competition.

More information: missionbaytriathlon.com

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